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Research & Impact

cancer cells that have been dyed purple, blue, and green

With engineering as our paintbrush and biology as our canvas, Stanford Bioengineering seeks not only to understand but also to create.

Research at Stanford Bioengineering seeks to measure and understand the world around us with utmost care and precision, to recreate the phenomena we witness, and to design tools and approaches with real applications that impact humanity.

From developing the first non-invasive prenatal test for Down syndrome to engineering a 50-cent microscope to improve access to scientific learning, Stanford Bioengineering is dedicated to discoveries and innovations that impact the world. Our wide, ever-expanding range of research studies and engineers biology at many levels:  molecules, cells, tissues, and organs.

Expanding the Frontiers of Bioengineering

optimigenetics

Diverse Research Areas

Measure, Model, Make. At its simplest, our research pivots on these three pillars at the intersections of, for, and with biology.

Prakash lab members talking in a group in a lab near a computer

Interdisciplinary Labs

Led by faculty, our labs conduct translational and entrepreneurial research that connects engineering and life sciences.

Research Centers & Facilities

State-of-the-art facilities and access to Stanford University’s schools of Medicine and Engineering offer bioengineering students unparalleled resources.

Research Centers & Facilities 

Making progress in COVID research

Stanford Bioengineering labs are actively engaged in projects to prevent, diagnose, and treat COVID-19.  These research projects include innovations in ventilator designs, development of serologic testing and diagnostic standards, application of computational screens and AI algorithms, and more. 

COVID-19 Seminar Talks

This series of talks feature Bioengineering faculty and other research leaders, with the latest news on how labs are working on ways to prevent, diagnose, and treat the virus.  By sharing and collaborating, we can make great progress together. 

Watch Highlight Videos

Translational Research and Education Programs

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Stanford-Coulter Translational Research Grants Program

The Stanford-Coulter Translational Research Grants Program awards up to $800,000 a year to Bioengineering faculty members and their clinician researcher collaborators from the School of Medicine to develop new technologies that lead to commercially available products.

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Stanford Byers Center for Biodesign

Biodesign focuses on building resources to support invention and technology transfer in the biomedical technology area. It provides faculty and students access to professionals in health care technology, along with patenting, prototyping, regulatory and other resources.

Stories & Voices from Faculty

Kwabena Boahen
Kwabena Boahen
Professor of Bioengineering and of Electrical Engineering

“ My first computer was essentially a glorified electronic calculator that could run BASIC programs ... ”

the Shriram building in the Stanford Engineering Quad at dusk

Industry Collaboration

Located in the heart of Silicon Valley, Stanford University is surrounded by an extraordinary collection of biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and medical technology companies. Stanford Bioengineering benefits from the wealth of mentorship and expertise in the community as well as from the continued support of a number of foundations, agencies, and individuals.

Student Research Opportunities

Many opportunities exist for Stanford undergraduate and graduate students to engage in cutting-edge research with Bioengineering faculty and other faculty across campus. Whether you’re interested in trying out research for one summer or choosing a lab to join for your PhD program, you’ll find the research opportunities to be interdisciplinary, hands-on, and aligned with your academic interests.

About Student Research

Stories & Voices from Students

Caitlyn Miller
Caitlyn Miller
PhD Candidate, Bioengineering

“ I was in 9th grade when my stepdad’s oral cancer returned. I remember feeling helpless because ... ”

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