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Thursday, January 14, 2016
Artificial intelligence has been on a six-decade ascent into realms once dominated by human experts. You know the highlights. Today computers regularly beat the world’s best chess masters at their own game. IBM’s Watson supercomputer has defeated all comers on Jeopardy! Algorithms regularly parse...
Tuesday, January 12, 2016
Two Stanford students are among the 100 students from around the world named 2016 Schwarzman Scholars. The program provides scholarships for a one-year master's degree program at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. The program is inspired by the Rhodes Scholarship...
Tuesday, January 5, 2016
In his role as a pediatrician, Manish Butte, MD, PhD, will often push and prod a patient’s abdomen, feeling for abnormalities — a swollen spleen, a hardened lymph node or an unusual lump in the intestines or liver. There are still some things that can only be gleaned by touch, and Butte believes...
Thursday, December 17, 2015
Millions of people each year are diagnosed with diseases that result in the loss of neuromuscular function. One of the complications in treating these people has been an inability to track the progression of disease and provide the best possible therapeutics. Now, a team of Stanford researchers has...
Monday, December 14, 2015
A collaboration between computer science engineers and geneticists at Stanford University has produced a novel technique for mapping the diversity of bacteria living in the human gut. The new approach revealed a far more diverse community than the researchers had anticipated. “The bacteria are...
Monday, December 7, 2015
All living things require proteins, members of a vast family of molecules that nature "makes to order" according to the blueprints in DNA. Through the natural process of evolution, DNA mutations generate new or more effective proteins. Humans have found so many alternative uses for these molecules...
Sunday, November 8, 2015
Karl Deisseroth, professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford, won a $3 million 2016 Breakthrough Prize in life sciences for his contributions to the development of optogenetics, a technique that uses light to control the behavior of cells and has proved...
Thursday, November 5, 2015
(Photo: Joel Simon Images)
Thursday, October 22, 2015
Ever since Stanford Engineering and Stanford Medicine joined together to create the Bioengineering Department in 2002, the ultimate plan was to begin with a Master’s and PhD program and eventually add an undergraduate major. The Faculty Senate brought this plan to fruition during the last academic...
Tuesday, October 20, 2015
Stephen Quake, a pioneering Stanford bioengineer whose work with microscopic amounts of fluid is transforming medicine, has received Brandeis University’s Jacob Heskel Gabbay Award in Biotechnology and Medicine. Quake, the Lee Otterson Professor of Bioengineering and Applied Physics, is a world-...

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