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neurons
Tuesday, July 19, 2016
How much about the human brain do we really know? Not enough, says bioengineer Karl Deisseroth. A milky, opaque tissue coats much of the organ, preventing researchers from seeing the all-important connections between neurons. So Deisseroth’s team developed a way to remove this cloud by chemically...
A dispensing chemist prepares drugs for a chemotherapy.
Tuesday, June 21, 2016
There’s a good, bad and ugly to cancer chemotherapy. The good is that the drugs do often effectively kill cancer cells. The bad is that the drugs also damage other quickly dividing cells in the body, causing side effects ranging from cosmetic, like hair loss, to disabling.
Tuesday, June 21, 2016
The future of artificial intelligence is now. After years of steady progress in making computers “smarter,” AI prototypes are being incorporated into hundreds of day-to-day actions, such as self-driving cars, intelligent smartphone assistants and several applications in academia, government and...
Thursday, May 26, 2016
The prefrontal cortex plays a mysterious yet central role in the mammalian brain. It has been linked to mood regulation, and different cells in the prefrontal cortex seem to respond to positive and negative experiences. How the prefrontal cortex governs these opposing processes of reward or...
Friday, May 20, 2016
​On this day in 1875, representatives from 17 nations signed the Meter Convention, establishing a global process for setting the uniform measures that help lay the foundation for commerce, industry and science advances in the 20th century.
Tuesday, May 17, 2016
There’s a good reason your doctor asks for a urine sample at your annual checkup. A simple, color-changing paper test, dipped into the specimen, can measure levels of glucose, blood, protein and other chemicals, which in turn can indicate evidence of kidney disease, diabetes, urinary tract...
Wednesday, May 11, 2016
Anyone who's seen a loved one through a losing battle with cancer can attest to the range of emotions as treatments begin, offer hope and ultimately fail. "A lot of things go through your head. For me it was mostly outrage," says Adam de la Zerda, who watched a friend succumb to brain cancer. "How...
Wednesday, May 11, 2016
For David Camarillo, concussions are a personal matter. The Stanford professor of bioengineering and of mechanical engineering played football for 10 years and estimates he was struck in the head thousands of times. However, even more damaging were the pair of concussions he sustained from bike...
Wednesday, May 4, 2016
Collagen is an essential protein for living tissue. It forms the stiff scaffolding that provides structure and stability for tissues and the cells within them. It is also nature’s packaging material, imbued with qualities that allow it to support and cushion cells, miraculously alternating between...
Wednesday, April 27, 2016
Applying the mathematical tools of management science to health care policy, Margaret Brandeau and her colleagues are challenging conventional wisdom about the best strategies for reducing the spread of HIV, hepatitis C and other communicable illnesses. In particular, they are seeking to understand...

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